The Ultimate Act of Generosity

Megan Morrey Stories

Susan Doherty’s son Elliott was diagnosed with hepatoblastoma at age 11. Susan now sits on the Children’s Cancer Research Fund Board of Directors. 

Every year in June, I take a moment to silently thank two families who, though I barely knew anything about them at the time, saved my son Elliott’s life.

Elliott was diagnosed with hepatoblastoma (liver cancer) when he was 11 years old. He would not have survived many rounds or chemotherapy without a liver transplant – two, actually, because he had a serious complication following the first.

Both organ donations were given at a time when families had just suffered a terrible loss, but still understood the power of the incredible gift they could give to another person like Elliott. It was the ultimate act of generosity.

Fast forward to now: Elliott has just finished his sophomore year of college. He still deals with late effects of harsh treatments, but he is thriving in the life he fought so hard for. One of the most concerning things for me going forward is that more children are being diagnosed with hepatoblastoma than ever before. In fact, it is becoming one of the fastest growing childhood cancers, and the research is struggling to keep up. Kids like Elliott need better treatments, better care and more support.

When you donate to Children’s Cancer Research Fund, you’re making an investment that can have a far-reaching impact. A strong history and great expertise make this a unique organization. I’ve seen the difference research makes in my own family, and I’m grateful every day – to Elliott’s liver donors, to his incredible clinical care team, to the researchers and to supporters like you. Thank you for your incredible generosity.

Sincerely,

Susan Doherty

Secretary, CCRF Board of Directors

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